Growth Strategy #48: Johari's Window

This is one of my favorite strategies that I use when mentoring, coaching and training. It helps individuals and teams understand themselves and each other better and provides a framework for uncovering strengths and weaknesses.

Growth Strategy #48: Johari's Window

This is one of my favourite strategies that I use when mentoring, coaching and training.  It helps individuals and teams understand themselves and each other better and provides a framework for uncovering strengths and weaknesses.

The Johari Window was originally developed in 1955 by psychologists Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, who believed that self-awareness is essential for personal growth and development.

Good for: Identifying blindspots to increase self-awareness
Best completed by: You, with a team, coach or mentor

The model uses four quadrants to represent different aspects of self-knowledge and awareness, which are open (known by both the individual and others), hidden (only known by the individual), blind (only known by others) and unknown (not yet known or discovered).

The idea behind the model is that a person's behaviour can be better understood when it is seen from all four perspectives. This helps individuals become more conscious of their own behaviour and take responsibility for the impact it has on their relationships with others. It also allows them to build trust through mutual sharing of information with their peers.

Additionally, the Johari Window can be used as an effective method of communication between two people, allowing each side to gain insight into how the other perceives them.

By recognizing each other’s feelings, values, motivations, and expectations, people can learn to better understand one another and develop stronger bonds.

Uncover blindspots

The Johari Window model is an effective tool for uncovering personal blind spots, as it provides an accessible framework for individuals to gain a better understanding of themselves and their relationships with others.

This model helps people become aware of information about themselves that is either unknown or hidden from others. It also encourages mutual sharing of information in order to build trust.

For example, by looking at the blind quadrant, people can become aware of how their behaviour is perceived by others, allowing them to be more conscious of what impact it has on their relationships. Similarly, looking at the hidden and unknown quadrants allows individuals to identify previously unidentified attributes and beliefs they possess which may be beneficial or hinder their development in some way.

Moreover, the Johari Window model offers a great method of communication between two people. By recognizing each other’s feelings, values, motivations and expectations through this framework, both sides can gain insights into how the other perceives them in order to better understand one another and develop stronger bonds.

By taking an honest look at themselves from all four perspectives outlined in the model – open, hidden, blind and unknown – people can discover areas where they need improvement or have strength that may have been overlooked before.

Ultimately, the Johari Window provides an effective framework for individuals to assess their self-awareness levels in order to achieve greater personal growth.

Experts who talk about Joharis' window

Many therapists and counselors have found great success when incorporating the Johari Window into therapeutic settings as it allows clients to explore areas that may have gone overlooked before while encouraging positive communication between all parties involved.

This form of therapy provides an atmosphere that encourages honesty, respect and understanding between participants which helps build trust and improves upon existing relationships as well as creating new ones.

  1. Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, the developers of Johari's window
  2. Daniel Goleman, a psychologist and author who has written about emotional intelligence and the role of self-awareness in personal and professional development
  3. Brené Brown, a researcher and author who has written about the importance of vulnerability and self-awareness in building meaningful connections with others
  4. Stephen Covey, a business consultant and author who has written about the importance of self-awareness in personal and professional development.
  5. David Mynett, a management consultant and author who has written about the use of Johari's window in team development and leadership.

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Dionne xxx ✨


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